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Robert DeNiro
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According to Alderson, Goldblum studied in NYC with Sandy, Alderson and Esper and then a year with Alderson in LA. He never finished the full 2 years. So he is not schooled in the full technique.

Nice guy, but not a Meisner teacher.
 
Posts: 524 | Location: Los Angeles | Registered: January 27, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Newbie
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quote:
Originally posted by toonaive:
Speaking of Jeff Goldblum, does he teach? I like him as an actor, I wonder if anybody has anything on him as a Meisner-based teacher.
he does. There a Jeff Goldblum master class level at PW West. A friend was in it. The last time I spoke to him about it, he complained that Jeff was hardly available to teach and thus, it was mostly taught by an underling.
 
Posts: 1296 | Location: LA,CA | Registered: May 06, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Kevin Bacon
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quote:
Originally posted by amo37:
Bill is the toughest person I've ever known. Two heart attacks and he still keeps a very, very full schedule. It's because he believes in what he's doing. He loves teaching so much. But as you've probably discovered, he expects his students to work very hard in class, but especially outside of class. He pulls no punches.

Once in my second year, I read a new scene. I thought it was ok. He pulled me in his office after class and said, "If you're doing out there (meaning in auditions) what you did in class, it's not good."

Best day of my acting life. I had done good work for him before, but was riding on my laurels with the new scene and had not done the work this time. I knew what to do but had not done it. I left his office in tears. He was right. But from then on, I took no shortcuts and promised him I would never again do bad work. I never did bad work in his class again.

The work ethic he teaches his students is invaluable and necessary in the real world. I appreciate and relish every tongue lashing and ass kicking he gave me over the years. And I have come to earn his respect through my hard work. I love him lots. And I use what he taught me for every single audition and performance. I know myself extensively, know how to dig deep and know how to break down a script, using Mesiner's Golden Box. He taught me how to make everything personal. And therefore, truthful.

Our uniqueness is a gift and makes us watchable.

I hope you're enjoying his class and learning alot. I know I did and still do.


I love tough teachers - when they're both tough and they're RIGHT. I have already a couple times gotten feedback that made me go huh? and then after rolling it around in my head for a while went oh yeah - he's right! I know what I should have done differently!
 
Posts: 40 | Location: Los Angeles | Registered: April 09, 2014Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Kevin Bacon
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quote:
Originally posted by amo37:
Unfortunately, the only person in LA who was trained by Meisner, hand-picked by Meisner as a student to teach at The Playhouse (Alderson Taught at The Playhouse for 22 years) and who taught ALONGSIDE Meisner is William Alderson and also Bill Esper in NYC.

Everyone else (I don't know anything about Mr. Barter) is not as qualified as far as I am concerned.

Exactly!
 
Posts: 35 | Location: Redondo Beach | Registered: November 10, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Johnny Depp
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"PW is not what it was 20 plus years ago. Now they have way too many teachers underneath Bob Carnegie and Jeff Goldblum." How did you come to such a conclusion? Have you studied at PW? Did you go through the entire program? Beginner? Intermediate? Advanced? Unless you have personally completed the program, then how could you possibly form such an opinion? Or did a friend of yours attend PW for a few months? OR a few weeks?

quote:
Originally posted by TRUTHTELLER59:
quote:
Originally posted by jruda:
Fact..Mr. Meisner himself (while commuting from New York and Los Angeles) when he was in Los Angeles-He taught at Playhouse West for the last 10 years of his teaching career.

Unfortunately, PW is not what it was 20 plus years ago. Now they have way too many teachers underneath Bob Carnegie and Jeff Goldblum.

PW is good if you want a taste of Meisner training if you have to wait for September for an opening in a traditional 2 year program or after you're done with a traditional 2 year and want VERY affordable ongoing training.
 
Posts: 6 | Location: Los Angeles | Registered: February 01, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Newbie
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quote:
Originally posted by jruda:
How did you come to such a conclusions? Have you studied at PW? Did you go through the entire program? Beginner? Intermediate? Advanced? Unless you have personally completed the program, then how could you possibly form such an opinion? Or did a friend of yours attend PW for a few months? OR a few weeks?

20 plus years ago, PW did teach the traditional program as Meisner intended it to be. This comes from someone who was at PW for years and had the fortune of being in the masterclasses when Sandy would visit.

I have worked with more than one person who spent a year or two and then went to Alderson or some other Meisner school that taught the traditional 2 years and they all didn't think PW was on the same level. Great school in general but not the best school if you want to learn Meisner in the most traditional way. Their words, not mine.

And no, I never take the credibility of people who only study at a school for a few weeks or months.

You've been there for a while and seem to be doing well so it's great to have someone currently with PW and loving it to chime in here.

As long as they're one of those schools that fairly advances people and not one that tries to keep people there as long as possible in order for them to finally study with the top dogs, then it's cool.
 
Posts: 1296 | Location: LA,CA | Registered: May 06, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Robert DeNiro
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Bob Carnegie was taught by Alderson. I hear he is a good teacher, but doesn't teach every class.

This to me would be confusing, having different teachers.

Ruskin is the same way, a friend told me who studied there. At least Alderson is with you every step of the way and even works with students outside of class, if need be. He would work with us on weekends as we prepared for scene night.
 
Posts: 524 | Location: Los Angeles | Registered: January 27, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Al Pacino
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quote:
Originally posted by jruda:
Fact..Mr. Meisner himself (while commuting from New York and Los Angeles) when he was in Los Angeles-He taught at Playhouse West for the last 10 years of his teaching career.


Another Fact: Meisner wanted the Playhouse to shut down after he retired / died.
 
Posts: 703 | Location: New York | Registered: January 25, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Johnny Depp
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quote:
Originally posted by amo37:
Untrue. Mr. Alderson has 16 students in his intensive class right now as well as his normal classes.


Hmmm... weird. My friend JUST met with him a week or two ago and he told me that Alderson said he might not be having a fall class beside continuing the class he has now. So essentially he would not be taking on any new students. Is this just because he's taking a break or he has his hands full? Or is my friend just full of shit? I would like to study with him but I know he is getting up there so when my friend told me he thought he was retiring I believed him.

Has anyone studied with Mestnik? She was taught by Esper, correct? And is her school multiple levels with different teachers? I don't mind that too much since it's no different than any college drama program or improv school. Just curious how that one works and might check that one out since Alderson's intensive is apparently already in progress.
 
Posts: 92 | Location: Los Angeles | Registered: January 21, 2014Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Newbie
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quote:
Originally posted by SomeButthole:
Has anyone studied with Mestnik? She was taught by Esper, correct? And is her school multiple levels with different teachers? I don't mind that too much since it's no different than any college drama program or improv school. Just curious how that one works and might check that one out since Alderson's intensive is apparently already in progress.

Yes, Elizabeth Mestnik studied with and was approved to teach the Meisner technique by Esper.

She has more elective offerings than most Meisner schools and different teachers teaching them, but she is mostly the traditional 2 year program which probably won't start up again until Fall.

Alderson is doing a 3 month intensive that started April and ends in June. This is NOT a replacement to the 2 year program that he usually teaches. The intensive is most likely a sampler for those curious about it.
 
Posts: 1296 | Location: LA,CA | Registered: May 06, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Newbie
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Wow, time flies! I realized that I'm coming close to the end of my 2nd year training. So here are my reflections on Meisner.

I am biased towards the traditional 2 year Meisner training, especially for those who did not have the benefit of going to a prestigious BFA/MFA/Conservatory program, because it's one of the few forms of training that I've seen that gives you the all around tools for being great at film/tv, stage, AND auditions. I wish I had done this before I ever took an audition or on camera class.

Most people think that all you do in Meisner is repetition. WRONG! That's at most a 1-2 month long thing to teach you to how to REALLY listen and to take the attention off of yourself and onto the other person. The repetition is also opinionated so you're also learning subtext (what's underneath what you're saying) while you're doing the repetition. Gradually, you do improvisations/independent activities where the repetition is eventually dropped and become REAL improvised scenes where there is a relationship, who, what, where, etc. These improvisations serve a purpose to prepare you for scenes that will use the tools learned from the improvisations.

You start scenes as soon as the 2nd-3rd month. For the first few scenes, you are told to learn the lines by rote with no choices or deep analysis but to know the lines flat and to work off of the other person to tell you how to say your lines, basically, making it conversational. BUT as you progress through the scenes, you gradually apply elements of script analysis to deepen your scenes. NO, this is not heady stuff like writing essays or a detailed backstory or history, BUT knowing simple AND specific things like your relationship, the moment before (done by Emotional Preparation, a Meisner tool), subtext, given circumstances, as-ifs, personalization and interpretation, time periods, styles, etc.

Besides sharpening my ability to listen and react even more, my biggest take-away from the 1ST Year was Emotional Preparation which is usually taught in the middle of the 1st year. This tool, in brief, is using your imagination or an “as if” to create the moment before and to truthfully have the required emotion at the start of a specific scene.

The Second year is probably the most unique of any kind of training I've personally encountered.

The biggest thing that I got from the Second year was Character Impediments and Dialects. You still continue the improvisations and scenes but you're taught how to NATURALLY and TRUTHFULLY play drunk, stoned, injured, blind, mentally slow, etc. or with an accent. I can't think of any other current training in LA, that gives you a process in doing these kind of things honestly.

You also delve even deeper into script analysis and breaking a scene down during the Second Year. And once again, NOTHING too intellectual. You're taught to make the academic work involved in acting organic and part of your subconscious so it doesn't get in the way of acting with your instincts. The script analysis is important because you start dealing with very difficult monologues like the Spoon River anthologies and scenes where just learning the lines is NOT enough.

At the same time as you learn script analysis, you also stretch your creativity and imagination as one of the unique exercises during the Second Year is "Nursery Rhymes." This exercise is fun in that you take a Nursery Rhyme like "Jack and Jill" and you create multiple interpretations by tweaking around the relationship, the who, what, where, when, why, etc. By doing this, you give the nursery rhyme a deeper story and are able create a completely different scene out of just the words of the Nursery Rhyme.
 
Posts: 1296 | Location: LA,CA | Registered: May 06, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Johnny Depp
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TRUTHTELLER, if you don't mind me asking, whose 2 year program are you taking?

I read Sandy's book and now I'm almost done with Esper's first one. Going to read his second one next. Esper's book has definitely convinced me to do a 2 year program.
 
Posts: 92 | Location: Los Angeles | Registered: January 21, 2014Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Nicholas Cage
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I think Rose misunderstood me about Meisner and range on that other thread or maybe I wasn't clear enough. It goes to show why I should never try to teach! haha

I didn't mean to imply that learning Meisner will necessarily keep you from having range. That would be silly. I just meant that some FREAKISHLY rangy actors might find it limiting because it doesn't include some of the specific, external based tools the ones I know find useful. All acting techniques are are going to be limited in some way when taken by themselves and most including Meisner can adapt well to "add-ons." For instance, Esper set up the BFA/MFA conservatory at Rutgers and chaired it for years. It is very much Meisner based, but they still bring in a Chekhov teacher second semester of second year besides studying other voice and movement oriented techniques all along.

The thing is, you would be better off studying in New York if you want those tools in any real depth. Somebody correct me if I am wrong, but I don't think anybody in LA teaches Laban movement analysis or Yat Malmgren's practical extension of it and I don't know where you would go to get somebody to take you through Lecoq's progression from neutral mask to red nose, Viewpoints, biomechanics, etc. There are a couple of Chekhov teachers, but that is about it to my knowledge. It doesn't look like the LA Meisner studios even teach Williamson movement which was specifically designed to go along with it.

I don't think you can really draw many conclusions about a technique based on which huge movie stars were trained in it, either. Definitely not when it comes to range. First off, the freakishly rangy actors I know are like that anyway. It is like they have some extra gears to their talent that we mere mortals don't that can be nurtured and made more consistent through different techniques. Besides that, there are a lot more screen actors who are capable of playing a huge range than are allowed to do so and that includes the stars. It is really only a few in a generation who are and you will see that they were all trained in different ways. This business loves to pigeonhole and how they broke out of that I don't know. If you are one of those actors who has that kind of range and feel like you can't be fulfilled as an artist without using it all the time, you might be better off sticking with regional theatre where it is valued more. In Hollywood, it's more of a curio and really kind of confuses the business. I forget which one, but I was looking at the different studio websites and one of the name teachers put it well in a video. "Why should they hire somebody who could be that when they can hire somebody who IS that?" (It was Aaron Speiser.) I know it makes some people cringe, but that about sums it up for 99% of screen actors.

Affective memory versus imagination, blah, blah, blah? So what? Try everything and use what works. There is no "right" way other than in the context of the class you are taking. What Stanislavski really told Stella Alder, what my Russian teacher says, the letters back and forth between Strasberg and Stan's first generation disciples, and where Stan was really at near the end of his life is immaterial. He was still exploring just like everybody else and if he had a mistake it was that he was trying to find a single panacea for great acting that does not exist because every actor is different. I prefer imagination, but I know actors who had the exact same training as me who are just as good or better that use affective memory or a combination all the time.

I see some other things on this thread that are giving me a headache, but I will leave them alone since I have already written way more than I had planned. I'm at home for the first time in a year so I will just take an aspirin and get over it since acting is the last thing I should be thinking about right now. haha
 
Posts: 226 | Location: Hollywood Hills | Registered: September 25, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Newbie
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quote:
Originally posted by gyokoren:
Somebody correct me if I am wrong, but I don't think anybody in LA teaches Laban movement analysis or Yat Malmgren's practical extension of it and I don't know where you would go to get somebody to take you through Lecoq's progression from neutral mask to red nose, Viewpoints, biomechanics, etc. There are a couple of Chekhov teachers, but that is about it to my knowledge. It doesn't look like the LA Meisner studios even teach Williamson movement which was specifically designed to go along with it.


Sadly no on in LA that I know of teaches Laban or Lecoq.

I know the few Chekhov teachers in LA work with masks and clown noses.

Probably the only type of movement class really taught in LA is Alexander technique.

Update:
I found this place. I'd be wary of anyone who teaches Michael Checkoff though:
http://www.holywoodactingstudio.com/?page_id=1271

I'd get kicked out of this school for dropping the f-bomb too much.
 
Posts: 1296 | Location: LA,CA | Registered: May 06, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Al Pacino
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quote:
Originally posted by TRUTHTELLER59:
I found this place. I'd be weary of anyone who teaches Michael Checkoff though:
http://www.holywoodactingstudio.com/?page_id=1271


If you read a little further along that sentence, it is just because of the "thinking hard."
 
Posts: 703 | Location: New York | Registered: January 25, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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