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Morgan Freeman
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by Newbie09:
Interesting thread. I went "all in" towards acting over the last 4 years. I have had some success, booked some cool things, met some great peeps, and had some great experiences. However, financially I am still no where near to making a living doing it... I have over 7 Years of Sales experience, and I am now considering going back to a full time sales job. I need money right now more than anything else. I am hoping to land a work from home sales job, which would allow me (hopefully) some time to still get out and audition... If I book, I would have to use a vacation day or a sick day... I am not quitting acting, but may be putting it on hiatus, while I get my finances back in order.


There seems to be a lot of flexible sales jobs that are commission only. The only problem from my experience was that the boss I used to work for was a greedy prick who's bottom line was really, really high in the sky...


Laugh when people try to take you as a fool.
 
Posts: 133 | Location: Los Angeles | Registered: January 06, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Russell Crowe
posted Hide Post
Depending on your academic background or whether you have a skilled trade, the ideal job for artists is being self-employed.

This could include

- real estate agent or mortgage broker
- contractor (accounting, tax, law, defense, or IT/programming, SEO, SAP/ERP, or business consulting etc)

While these gigs don't have steady income like a salaried 9-5 (it's a 1099 life!), the pay is often much higher than you'd get in any service jobs at restaurants, bars, hotels, etc while also being flexible enough that you are more in control of your work schedule. Depending on the projects or nature of work, a lot of it could allow you to work from home rather than on site, which further adds to your flexibility.

Or some sort of small business that you own.

There's also substitute teaching.
 
Posts: 96 | Location: Los Angeles | Registered: August 25, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Morgan Freeman
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by donquixote:
Depending on your academic background or whether you have a skilled trade, the ideal job for artists is being self-employed.

This could include

- real estate agent or mortgage broker
- contractor (accounting, tax, law, defense, or IT/programming, SEO, SAP/ERP, or business consulting etc)

While these gigs don't have steady income like a salaried 9-5 (it's a 1099 life!), the pay is often much higher than you'd get in any service jobs at restaurants, bars, hotels, etc while also being flexible enough that you are more in control of your work schedule. Depending on the projects or nature of work, a lot of it could allow you to work from home rather than on site, which further adds to your flexibility.

Or some sort of small business that you own.

There's also substitute teaching.


Do you know any actors who have jobs in these fields who actually audition? Real Estate from what I here is still time consuming and "feast or famine". Also, specifically what jobs in law? I can't imagine a law firm being okay with having a laywer leave in the middle of while they are building a case. Also business consulting sounds like a position that you build up to. Why would I pay someone to consult my business if they are not a successful business owner? Please enlighten me.

Also unlike in other states, substitutes in califorina have to have full teaching credentials if they want a real shot. Priority goes to the pleathora of teachers who WANT TO TEACH first and foremost, which makes sense as some schools desperately need passionate teachers as opposed to just part-timers who are in it for the pay check and security.


Laugh when people try to take you as a fool.
 
Posts: 133 | Location: Los Angeles | Registered: January 06, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Russell Crowe
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by Totallycool:
Do you know any actors who have jobs in these fields who actually audition? Real Estate from what I here is still time consuming and "feast or famine". Also, specifically what jobs in law? I can't imagine a law firm being okay with having a laywer leave in the middle of while they are building a case. Also business consulting sounds like a position that you build up to. Why would I pay someone to consult my business if they are not a successful business owner? Please enlighten me.


I actually know actors who have done this.

Realtors: I've bumped into a few while house hunting (I've also met a few realtors who were DJs or music producers). And yes, it's feast or famine, but the money is still better than being a server, and it's a profession that can more likely sustain you into middle age (or help you transition into other lines of work).

Law: the folks I know who do this are in their 30s and 40s. If you work at a firm, it may mean sacrificing the partner-track: taking support roles, more like paralegal work. I also know lawyers who are self-employed - again they are experienced in a specific practice area (trademark). As for paralegal work: I do remember actors (maybe even on this board) who have done it, and you don't need to be a lawyer to do that.

A lot of people have misconceptions of lawyer work: criminal law and litigation are what the public mostly sees, but in reality, they make up a small portion of the total. Most lawyers specialize in corporate/securities (dealing with Wall Street), trademark (dealing with tech firms and film/tv/sports), tax, real estate, employment, immigration and family/estates. Lawyers in these practices will rarely even see a courtroom in their lifetimes because the nature of their work doesn't require it. Basically the case work is mostly handling paperwork (lots of back and forth over email, adding/deleting sections of a document). If you're a junior person (associate, paralegal) you may not even meet the client, as you're basically just filling out paperwork. For example for trademark - a client (tech company) may need to file a patent, so they hire a trademark lawyer to do that. Most of the work is simply filling out applications for the US trademark office. Depending on the firm you're at, it really is deadline driven, but since so much of it is handled over email, your time is more flexible and you can work remotely more easily than other jobs. Downside is that it's not particularly interesting, and the law market right now sucks (too many lawyers, not enough work).

As for business consulting, it's often misunderstood. You're not really imparting 'wisdom' to a client. It's mostly highly specific stuff that businesses may outsource. For example, market research - a company may be looking to launch a product in a new country, but they don't have the staff to do all the number crunching, so they outsource that to someone who can on a project specific basis. Or a company may be looking to buy another company, and they need to do research - again, they will outsource the grunt work so their employees can focus on the day-to-day. Again it's not about wisdom, and more about having a specific area of expertise or skill (tax accounting, market research, SEO, etc) that a business may simply want to outsource.

Another area is corporate recruiting (headhunting) where you're basically helping companies find mid-level to high level executives and technical staff (or vice versa: helping unhappy execs find jobs).

The few actors I've encountered with a trade or technical skills that seem to have no troubles finding freelance work are those with IT/programming backgrounds.
 
Posts: 96 | Location: Los Angeles | Registered: August 25, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Russell Crowe
posted Hide Post
Another unusual day job for actors whom I've met:

Ordained ministers who do weddings and funerals. Some of the services are religious, many are not. Seems to be mostly weekend work too.
 
Posts: 96 | Location: Los Angeles | Registered: August 25, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Morgan Freeman
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by donquixote:
quote:
Originally posted by Totallycool:
Do you know any actors who have jobs in these fields who actually audition? Real Estate from what I here is still time consuming and "feast or famine". Also, specifically what jobs in law? I can't imagine a law firm being okay with having a laywer leave in the middle of while they are building a case. Also business consulting sounds like a position that you build up to. Why would I pay someone to consult my business if they are not a successful business owner? Please enlighten me.


I actually know actors who have done this.

Realtors: I've bumped into a few while house hunting (I've also met a few realtors who were DJs or music producers). And yes, it's feast or famine, but the money is still better than being a server, and it's a profession that can more likely sustain you into middle age (or help you transition into other lines of work).

Law: the folks I know who do this are in their 30s and 40s. If you work at a firm, it may mean sacrificing the partner-track: taking support roles, more like paralegal work. I also know lawyers who are self-employed - again they are experienced in a specific practice area (trademark). As for paralegal work: I do remember actors (maybe even on this board) who have done it, and you don't need to be a lawyer to do that.

A lot of people have misconceptions of lawyer work: criminal law and litigation are what the public mostly sees, but in reality, they make up a small portion of the total. Most lawyers specialize in corporate/securities (dealing with Wall Street), trademark (dealing with tech firms and film/tv/sports), tax, real estate, employment, immigration and family/estates. Lawyers in these practices will rarely even see a courtroom in their lifetimes because the nature of their work doesn't require it. Basically the case work is mostly handling paperwork (lots of back and forth over email, adding/deleting sections of a document). If you're a junior person (associate, paralegal) you may not even meet the client, as you're basically just filling out paperwork. For example for trademark - a client (tech company) may need to file a patent, so they hire a trademark lawyer to do that. Most of the work is simply filling out applications for the US trademark office. Depending on the firm you're at, it really is deadline driven, but since so much of it is handled over email, your time is more flexible and you can work remotely more easily than other jobs. Downside is that it's not particularly interesting, and the law market right now sucks (too many lawyers, not enough work).

As for business consulting, it's often misunderstood. You're not really imparting 'wisdom' to a client. It's mostly highly specific stuff that businesses may outsource. For example, market research - a company may be looking to launch a product in a new country, but they don't have the staff to do all the number crunching, so they outsource that to someone who can on a project specific basis. Or a company may be looking to buy another company, and they need to do research - again, they will outsource the grunt work so their employees can focus on the day-to-day. Again it's not about wisdom, and more about having a specific area of expertise or skill (tax accounting, market research, SEO, etc) that a business may simply want to outsource.

Another area is corporate recruiting (headhunting) where you're basically helping companies find mid-level to high level executives and technical staff (or vice versa: helping unhappy execs find jobs).

The few actors I've encountered with a trade or technical skills that seem to have no troubles finding freelance work are those with IT/programming backgrounds.


Thank you, your post is the most helpful one I've seen about day jobs ever on this board. Smiler


Laugh when people try to take you as a fool.
 
Posts: 133 | Location: Los Angeles | Registered: January 06, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Johnny Depp
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by Totallycool:
Sorry, but I just felt that you were trying to SELL us this job...


You got that vibe, too? Standing around a store selling samples for $11/hr sounds terrible. I would much rather wait tables.

Any freelance you can do is a good day job: photography, furniture restoration, website building, editing, personal training, etc. You can charge your own rate and make your own schedule. But I would definitely try to do it as a side gig first and see if you can generate enough revenue to survive before quitting your day job.
 
Posts: 92 | Location: Los Angeles | Registered: January 21, 2014Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Al Pacino
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by Totallycool:
Thank you, your post is the most helpful one I've seen about day jobs ever on this board. Smiler


I know many many lawyers, paralegals and legal aides in just about every aspect of law. Very very few of them work anything less than 40 hours (the absolute bare minimum here). The majority of them often work six or seven days, if not till 9 or 10pm every day. It is absolutely one of the last jobs I would recommend to someone who has any interest in acting. Just because you're doing the grunt work doesn't mean you are gonna have a shorter day.

In addition, as far as consulting, paralegaling, IT, programming, most of the jobs mentioned you are at a huge disadvantage if you do not have a Bachelors as well without significant relevent experience.
 
Posts: 1002 | Location: New York | Registered: January 25, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Russell Crowe
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by Syphus:
quote:
Originally posted by Totallycool:
Thank you, your post is the most helpful one I've seen about day jobs ever on this board. Smiler


I know many many lawyers, paralegals and legal aides in just about every aspect of law. Very very few of them work anything less than 40 hours (the absolute bare minimum here). The majority of them often work six or seven days, if not till 9 or 10pm every day. It is absolutely one of the last jobs I would recommend to someone who has any interest in acting. Just because you're doing the grunt work doesn't mean you are gonna have a shorter day.

In addition, as far as consulting, paralegaling, IT, programming, most of the jobs mentioned you are at a huge disadvantage if you do not have a Bachelors as well without significant relevent experience.


I don't know why you're being such a Negative Nancy with me.

Anyhow, with the law it depends on the practice area and of course your location. You being in New York, I'm not surprised since most of the work is in securities/corp where their clients are investment banks.

But out west, I do know lawyers and paralegals here who are also actors. In certain practice areas like trademark/IP, employment and so forth, the hours are variable (and maybe even light because there isn't a lot of work these days so there's simply less billable hours).

And yes, for many of these jobs, you do need the relevant academic background and experience, but remember not everybody here who is pursuing acting is coming straight from high school, or is a liberal arts major (not that they're equivalent haha).

Rather than just saying what CAN'T work, what are your constructive suggestions?
 
Posts: 96 | Location: Los Angeles | Registered: August 25, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Newbie
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by harlemhippo:
quote:
Originally posted by Epicurus:
You forgot to say what your job actually is, John. Smiler


Ha ha...kind of intentional. I do marketing for a resort company.

Oh yeah, as far as day jobs go...as LuckyMe73 said above...I came early, left late, did everything I could to keep work a very smooth sailing ship, so when I do have to leave for a few days or a few weeks for an acting gig, they know I am still very serious about the work at work.


are you guys hiring? lol
 
Posts: 6 | Location: LA | Registered: October 07, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Morgan Freeman
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by SomeButthole:
quote:
Originally posted by Totallycool:
Sorry, but I just felt that you were trying to SELL us this job...


You got that vibe, too? Standing around a store selling samples for $11/hr sounds terrible. I would much rather wait tables.

Any freelance you can do is a good day job: photography, furniture restoration, website building, editing, personal training, etc. You can charge your own rate and make your own schedule. But I would definitely try to do it as a side gig first and see if you can generate enough revenue to survive before quitting your day job.


I couldn't help but say that this sounded like an infomercial for Crossmark where you pay to get RICH! Anyone who would compare this work to acting in any way is seriously out of touch. This piece of "advertising copy" for a post was horrible and had the complete opposite effect of making me excited. Sales tip: Just because you add an exclamation point on the end and put letters in all CAPS doesn't mean that excitement is being generated! Actors are smart people too. I know they like to target actors because of our "presence" but if the owners of these companies think that these things fulfill actors then they are seriously deluded and in my opinion want a whole lot for nothing! Triple that rate, then we can talk.


Laugh when people try to take you as a fool.
 
Posts: 133 | Location: Los Angeles | Registered: January 06, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Russell Crowe
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by Totallycool:


Do you know any actors who have jobs in these fields who actually audition? Real Estate from what I here is still time consuming and "feast or famine". Also, specifically what jobs in law? I can't imagine a law firm being okay with having a laywer leave in the middle of while they are building a case. Also business consulting sounds like a position that you build up to. Why would I pay someone to consult my business if they are not a successful business owner? Please enlighten me.


I have a software engineering background...and for my day job am a Sr. Database Analyst. Its as flexible as I want it to be. I audition usually several times a week 1 or 2 but up to 6 or 7 (which is a pretty busy week for me) and leave for 1 to several hours at a time. On days where I have more than 2 auditions, I just take the day off or decide to work from home that day (and work that night). That said I really had to earn the right to do these things.

I initially took a job in LA that gave me no flexibility...a month later quit...and decided to hold out for the perfect company. I found them and am very happy. I work my ass off and definitely put in overtime....but its at my leisure. So it can be done.
 
Posts: 30 | Location: Los Angeles, CA | Registered: August 21, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Morgan Freeman
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by Bez:
quote:
Originally posted by Totallycool:


Do you know any actors who have jobs in these fields who actually audition? Real Estate from what I here is still time consuming and "feast or famine". Also, specifically what jobs in law? I can't imagine a law firm being okay with having a laywer leave in the middle of while they are building a case. Also business consulting sounds like a position that you build up to. Why would I pay someone to consult my business if they are not a successful business owner? Please enlighten me.


I have a software engineering background...and for my day job am a Sr. Database Analyst. Its as flexible as I want it to be. I audition usually several times a week 1 or 2 but up to 6 or 7 (which is a pretty busy week for me) and leave for 1 to several hours at a time. On days where I have more than 2 auditions, I just take the day off or decide to work from home that day (and work that night). That said I really had to earn the right to do these things.

I initially took a job in LA that gave me no flexibility...a month later quit...and decided to hold out for the perfect company. I found them and am very happy. I work my ass off and definitely put in overtime....but its at my leisure. So it can be done.


Thanks.


Laugh when people try to take you as a fool.
 
Posts: 133 | Location: Los Angeles | Registered: January 06, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Newbie
posted Hide Post
Do you tell your employer? Do you guys suggest us telling the employer that we have these auditions to go to but can make up the hours? I feel that.. when an employer hears that.. they immediately won't hire you
 
Posts: 6 | Location: LA | Registered: October 07, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Johnny Depp
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by TiffersLiu:
Do you tell your employer? Do you guys suggest us telling the employer that we have these auditions to go to but can make up the hours? I feel that.. when an employer hears that.. they immediately won't hire you


Well, I haven't needed to leave work too often for auditions yet. Usually most of the auditions I have had I just explain my work schedule to the casting director and they're pretty understanding and flexible ("We'll be casting until 8pm so whenever you get here we'll try to fit you in.") So I try as best as I can to fit it in without disrupting my work schedule (lunch hour or after work).

If it's something that I really want to audition for and need to re-arrange my schedule, I just lie and make up another excuse (car needs to go into the shop, doctor appointment, plumber is coming, etc.) with the promise to my employer that I can make up the hours later in the day/week if needed. Obviously don't do this often or they'll catch on, or get start getting annoyed.

If/when my acting career starts picking up, I'll be looking for a job with a more flexible schedule. I never tell an employer that I'm an actor at the interview. Almost all of them do not want to hear that because then they know you'll be requesting all this time off, making their job much more of a hassle, and possibly dipping out if you get a role. They probably will not hire you, but the next person in line who will make their job much easier. Low level paying jobs are probably a lot more flexible, but you're also making sh*t, so there's definitely a trade-off here.
 
Posts: 92 | Location: Los Angeles | Registered: January 21, 2014Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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