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Newbie
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quote:
Originally posted by TRUTHTELLER59:
quote:
Originally posted by Michellejohnsons:
quote:
Originally posted by TRUTHTELLER59:
Brown Academy?! You mean Baron/Brown?


Yeah its Brown not Baron http://www.brown.edu/academics...performance-studies/

Why would you recommend an Ivy League school in Rhode Island when the topic is LA schools?


No, I do not advice anything untill and unless I am sure about it. And as far as Ivy League School, I am sorry but not really aware about it. I will ask my cousin about it and then probably can tell you about it.
 
Posts: 9 | Location: Los Angeles | Registered: November 24, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Denzel Washington
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Are you a seven year old?
 
Posts: 86 | Location: Los Angeles, CA | Registered: November 05, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Newbie
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NOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO Eeker Wink
 
Posts: 9 | Location: Los Angeles | Registered: November 24, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Newbie
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FYI....

A 7 year old might not be knowing about Yale, Brown, and acting corps. I am a graduate from NYU
 
Posts: 9 | Location: Los Angeles | Registered: November 24, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Johnny Depp
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Brown University is an ivy league university in the United States. One does not simply "try" Brown.
 
Posts: 77 | Location: LA | Registered: August 03, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Newbie
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quote:
Brown

Thanks but I only remember Brown. And thats what my cousin told me .
 
Posts: 9 | Location: Los Angeles | Registered: November 24, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Newbie
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And FYI there a loads of acting schools affiliated to Ivy League school. Not only Brown but Yale also and many more.
 
Posts: 9 | Location: Los Angeles | Registered: November 24, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Marlon Brando
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quote:
Originally posted by Michellejohnsons:
And FYI there a loads of acting schools affiliated to Ivy League school. Not only Brown but Yale also and many more.

Duh! Yes, we all know that Yale is one the THE BEST schools in the world for acting.

But to recommend Ivy League schools when the topic is about LA is pointless. FYI Ivy Leagues aren't in LA.
 
Posts: 2118 | Location: LA,CA | Registered: May 06, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Johnny Depp
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I tried Acting Corps. Least favorite school mainly because Eugene came into the class of a recently hired teacher and took it over. He proceeded to take it up with one of the students, forgot why.

Anyway, the teacher (a working actor) stepped in to add his 2 cents which somewhat contradicted what Eugene was saying, this guy snaps on the teacher in front of everyone. After that day I was done with it, I don't like people who swear things should be done one way (their way). I usually don't call anyone out like that, but in this case I was disgusted.

Don't get me wrong, if you're new to LA and have a decent amount of cash. It's a great place to meet buddies and develop the basics but I would rather spend my money somewhere else.

I loved these next few teachers.

Doug Warhit - He's blunt, definitely tries to get the best out of you. At times he can seem a tad harsh but I think that's just his way of communicating. He is spot on with notes from my experience.

Saxon Trainor - Totally different, she gives me more of a tender and relaxed vibe. She's more laid back but she knew how to teach and gave great advice as well.

Kimberly Jentzen - I took her 3 day intensive back when I lived in Miami a couple years ago. I was very impressed, from what I remember she was catering and also gave me good notes.

However, like many before have said, find the teacher you click with. I'd also like to note that these are just MY experiences, I know it's not the be all end all.

Oh and if looking for improv, my experience with Groundlings brought nothing but knowledge and laughter.
 
Posts: 7 | Location: Los Angeles, California | Registered: November 17, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Newbie
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Howard Fine is sooo expensive. $1700 for 12 weeks for their "foundational" class? No thanks
 
Posts: 6 | Location: SoCal | Registered: August 19, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Marlon Brando
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quote:
Originally posted by LASoCal:
Howard Fine is sooo expensive. $1700 for 12 weeks for their "foundational" class? No thanks

Seriously. The last 6 weeks of it is on how to rehearse. I HATE rehearsing unless there's some major stunt or something like that!

Even if you just take the first part of the 12 weeks and want to go straight into classes, you have to pay $50 to audition to bypass the rehearsal and homework part of the 12 weeks.
 
Posts: 2118 | Location: LA,CA | Registered: May 06, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Sean Penn
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quote:
Originally posted by TRUTHTELLER59:
I HATE rehearsing unless there's some major stunt or something like that!

Why do you hate it?

I appreciate a lot of the information you post on this forum. Lots of people do. Your info can be very useful, especially to newer actors. But if you are encouraging actors to think rehearsing for scene study outside of class is a waste of time then I have to give my contrasting view.

There are a few scene study teachers who do not have their students rehearse outside of class. I would avoid those teachers like the plague.

You may think that because actors do not rehearse before shooting on set they should not rehearse for scene study classes either. It's true that much of the time there is little or no rehearsal before you go on set but some directors do have their actors rehearse ahead of shooting if the budget allows. That is because directors know the value of rehearsal.

In any case it is important to know that the main purpose of scene study class is not to replicate what happens on a film set. The purpose is to become the best possible actor you can become. That's the value of a lot of outside of class rehearsal.

Rehearsal is the place where you learn, discover, and develop totally new ways of doing things. It's a huge process of discovery that does not take place without it. Or if it does take place it is an agonizingly slow process that only takes place once a week in a class. Studying your craft only three hours once a week is a prescription for failure as an actor.

I think you should be rehearsing out of class with your scene partner 1 or 2 hours a week, minimum, for each page of dialogue you have. Then put your scene up in class in front of a true master teacher and get further adjustments. Then you rehearse the scene outside of class again a lot the following week. Study your scene a lot on your own too. Don't put the scene to rest until your teacher is satisfied. At which time you get another scene and a new partner and do the same thing again. Doing this with multiple scenes is even better.

Do that week in and week out for a couple years with a great teacher and watch your acting ability grow from muck to the stratosphere. Watch yourself become an actor in demand.

Rehearsing this way prepares you for jobs even where there is no time to rehearse. You have years of dynamic thinking and choices in all those rehearsals that you've done and can bring to life with brand new material you will perform on set. That makes you able to develop more dynamic and interesting choices when you only have a little time to develop your character.

If you want to replicate what happens on a set then take an on camera class for a month and then you'll have it. But if you want to become a great actor do scene study and rehearse to perfection and beyond.

And you should never be doing actual stunts in any acting class. If you want to be a stunt person, take stunt training. They have it here in LA.
 
Posts: 169 | Location: Beverly Hills | Registered: September 16, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Marlon Brando
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quote:
Originally posted by 108:
There are a few scene study teachers who do not have their students rehearse outside of class. I would avoid those teachers like the plague.


There goes Warner Loughlin and the majority of Meisner teachers out there. ;P

I see where you're coming from, but I prefer avoiding any kind of planned or premeditated stuff as much as possible and let whatever happens, happen. Of course I do care about what's going on, my relationship, environment, moment before, and my lines in general to name a few and I pray to God my partner has those things down as well.

I'm not against meeting with my partner to discuss the details we both should know prior to the actual scene(ie. relationship, environment, etc.), but I've had way too many negative experiences where the other actor is like "oh yeah, on this line, I'm going to cry and before I say this line, can you make a face to trigger how I'm going to say it? etc." Or trying to convince the other actor to not try to replicate any great moment that might have happened earlier in rehearsal. That moment is past and trying to make that happen again just makes it look like acting.
 
Posts: 2118 | Location: LA,CA | Registered: May 06, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Sean Penn
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Fair enough.

Everybody is different to some extent. Some actors learn better by doing things differently then other actors and there are a few who learn in ways that are completely different from the way most actors learn.

And of course you're completely spot on that the rehearsal process should not be how to plan out things technically at specific points in a scene. Every time a scene is performed it can be done differently from the previous times. To plan ahead deciding to do this or that at some specific point or to cry or to be technical about anything is rarely a good idea. That's why I believe actors should not do on camera training for prolonged periods of time. It becomes more of a technical exercise than acting (cheat toward the camera, hit your mark, keep your head up so we can see your face, etc). It's good to know all that but scene study without a camera is the way to develop acting skills for the sake of acting itself. That's what I think.

If an actor is open and spontaneous they know what they feel going into the scene from the character's previous history and the moment before but they don't know what's going to happen in the scene because it hasn't happened yet. A character might feel compelled to cry at one point in the scene. Then when the actors rehearse the scene again the dynamic of both people may have changed and it may be more truthful to laugh on the same line.

Rigidly planning out a scene is rarely a good idea. The lines are the lines but the subtext is fully open and most certainly not set in stone. That's for actors to interpret. The lines are for the writer, the subtext is for the actor. Otherwise the audience could just read the script and not bother seeing actors in a play or movie.

It's more important, in my opinion, to be affected internally with the rehearsal process rather then externally. The external will take care of itself if one is affected internally.

In scene study, whether you rehearse or not, you have a scene partner who is good at the craft or not so good. I would say an actor should basically concern themselves with themselves. Do good yourself and it can bring up your partner as well. But a bad scene partner can be a drag. That's why there are beginning, intermediate, advanced and master classes; so actors can be matched up without one being pulled down by the other.

I actually avoid Meisner based teachers. But that's another topic for another day.

Good discussion.
 
Posts: 169 | Location: Beverly Hills | Registered: September 16, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Newbie
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quote:
Originally posted by Eleonel:
I tried Acting Corps. Least favorite school mainly because Eugene came into the class of a recently hired teacher and took it over. He proceeded to take it up with one of the students, forgot why.

Anyway, the teacher (a working actor) stepped in to add his 2 cents which somewhat contradicted what Eugene was saying, this guy snaps on the teacher in front of everyone. After that day I was done with it, I don't like people who swear things should be done one way (their way). I usually don't call anyone out like that, but in this case I was disgusted.

Don't get me wrong, if you're new to LA and have a decent amount of cash. It's a great place to meet buddies and develop the basics but I would rather spend my money somewhere else.

I loved these next few teachers.

Doug Warhit - He's blunt, definitely tries to get the best out of you. At times he can seem a tad harsh but I think that's just his way of communicating. He is spot on with notes from my experience.

Saxon Trainor - Totally different, she gives me more of a tender and relaxed vibe. She's more laid back but she knew how to teach and gave great advice as well.

Kimberly Jentzen - I took her 3 day intensive back when I lived in Miami a couple years ago. I was very impressed, from what I remember she was catering and also gave me good notes.

However, like many before have said, find the teacher you click with. I'd also like to note that these are just MY experiences, I know it's not the be all end all.

Oh and if looking for improv, my experience with Groundlings brought nothing but knowledge and laughter.


Hi Johnny
Eugene ?? Are you sure ? My cousin praises him a lot for the way he interacts with his students and moreover he once told me "Eugene deserves to be an actor not a teacher"
 
Posts: 9 | Location: Los Angeles | Registered: November 24, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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