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Kevin Bacon
posted Hide Post
Thanks MominBiz! So what exactly is the difference between a co-star and a guest star?
 
Posts: 34 | Location: New York | Registered: April 09, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Sean Penn
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by Syphus:
quote:
Originally posted by Fishgurl:

The person who said it's best to list your student film credits as such in New York is right, too. It's considered misleading if you don't.


I'm not exactly sure about this here. At least at the grad level. If you are in a Columbia MFA film that wins something at Sundance, or if you're in some low budget film that wins something at Sundance. What exactly makes the two different? And how exactly would it be "misleading?"



Agreed that it's not misleading if you don't label your work as student film. In fact no one should literally write out "student film" on their resume. I see actors list the school's name in parentheses after the director's name or vice versa, but only if it's Columbia or NYU or SVA because those names carry some cache around here. That's the only reason to give any sort of indication that you did a student film.

And from what I understand this is different in LA - people don't list the school's name even if it's a good school, because it's considered better that people don't know it's a student film than know it was from a good school. (The opposite seems to be the case in NY.)
 
Posts: 84 | Location: New York | Registered: August 29, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Marlon Brando
Picture of TRUTHTELLER59
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A co star can be just one line like "may I take your order" and you genrally help or hinder the series leads/regulars

A guest star is a much bigger role where the show episode story arc tends to focus more on that character
 
Posts: 2134 | Location: LA,CA | Registered: May 06, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Denzel Washington
posted Hide Post
quote:
I'm not exactly sure about this here. At least at the grad level. If you are in a Columbia MFA film that wins something at Sundance, or if you're in some low budget film that wins something at Sundance. What exactly makes the two different? And how exactly would it be "misleading?"
This isn't a matter of films that go on the festival circuit. Those show up on IMDb. It's considered misleading mainly because of so many people trying to inflate their resumes with bullshit. The key is to succinctly make it known where you really stand in your career so people don't have to go looking on IMDb and roll their eyes when somebody claiming thirty credits or whatever has just listed directors' names they've never heard of with little if anything showing up. "NYU Graduate Thesis" is honest and doesn't look bad at all. It's definitely not a "resume stupid." In fact, it sets the credit apart from the garbage horror shorts and whatnot a lot of people try to dress up as legitimate credits. Everybody has to start somewhere and there's no sin in doing those things. The message, I think, is don't try to make it look like they're more than they are.
 
Posts: 162 | Location: La La Land | Registered: March 28, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Harrison Ford
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by TRUTHTELLER59:
A co star can be just one line like "may I take your order" and you genrally help or hinder the series leads/regulars

A guest star is a much bigger role where the show episode story arc tends to focus more on that character


Re: Guest Star - or, when the actor is union, it may be a small role with less than 5 lines, but hired as a Guest Star as negotiated by an agent and/or written in the contract.


- MIB -
"If you can dream, you can do. Making it happen is up to you!"
 
Posts: 873 | Location: SoCal | Registered: July 13, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Harrison Ford
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by jadednewyorker:
quote:
Originally posted by Syphus:
quote:
Originally posted by Fishgurl:

The person who said it's best to list your student film credits as such in New York is right, too. It's considered misleading if you don't.


I'm not exactly sure about this here. At least at the grad level. If you are in a Columbia MFA film that wins something at Sundance, or if you're in some low budget film that wins something at Sundance. What exactly makes the two different? And how exactly would it be "misleading?"



Agreed that it's not misleading if you don't label your work as student film. In fact no one should literally write out "student film" on their resume. I see actors list the school's name in parentheses after the director's name or vice versa, but only if it's Columbia or NYU or SVA because those names carry some cache around here. That's the only reason to give any sort of indication that you did a student film.

And from what I understand this is different in LA - people don't list the school's name even if it's a good school, because it's considered better that people don't know it's a student film than know it was from a good school. (The opposite seems to be the case in NY.)


I've seen and helped others with their resumes listed both ways, both in LA and NY. It really doesn't matter, BUT, if you want to have a separate resume for auditioning for film schools, it actually helps to list the school after the director if you are auditioning for another student film in the same school in which you've already worked. So many of the film students work together in different capacities on each other's projects. Word gets around which can help the actor book a job from working with the same crew (IF the actor did their job well with no complaints, that is!!!) Anyway, don't overthink it! Listing the school or not, it is still considered work and experience, and that is what counts. Listing the school names shows that the actor loves what they do, no matter where they are working. It's really just a personal choice both in LA and NY! As casting director/author/consultant Bonnie Gillespie would say, it's mind taffy! Wink Do the work, love it and list it!


- MIB -
"If you can dream, you can do. Making it happen is up to you!"
 
Posts: 873 | Location: SoCal | Registered: July 13, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Kevin Bacon
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What about internet/interactive media? i've heard it's a bit of a gray area. if it's professionally done, should it be grouped with film or have its own category?
 
Posts: 34 | Location: New York | Registered: April 09, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Marlon Brando
Picture of TRUTHTELLER59
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by ss630:
What about internet/interactive media? i've heard it's a bit of a gray area. if it's professionally done, should it be grouped with film or have its own category?


What's your definition of internet/interactive media?

If it's a webseries, you can go:
TV/Web

If it's some online commercial or industrial, then it doesn't go on your resume. You can put it on your separate commercial list.
 
Posts: 2134 | Location: LA,CA | Registered: May 06, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Kevin Bacon
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by TRUTHTELLER59:
quote:
Originally posted by ss630:
What about internet/interactive media? i've heard it's a bit of a gray area. if it's professionally done, should it be grouped with film or have its own category?


What's your definition of internet/interactive media?

If it's a webseries, you can go:
TV/Web

If it's some online commercial or industrial, then it doesn't go on your resume. You can put it on your separate commercial list.


Thanks TruthTeller! I meant a web series or other online legit work. So it is best to combine it with the TV category instead of giving it its own? And do you use the same co-star, guest-star, etc. credits as you would for tv?
 
Posts: 34 | Location: New York | Registered: April 09, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Marlon Brando
Picture of TRUTHTELLER59
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Or if you have a lot of tv credits, you can have a web/new media section.

I use the TV jargon (series lead, series regular, guest star, co star, recurring, etc) for web series.
 
Posts: 2134 | Location: LA,CA | Registered: May 06, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Glenn Close
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by TRUTHTELLER59:
Or if you have a lot of tv credits, you can have a web/new media section.

I use the TV jargon (series lead, series regular, guest star, co star, recurring, etc) for web series.


TV Jargon was my thought too...but what if it's a web movie, like something like Dr Horrible?
 
Posts: 956 | Location: New York | Registered: January 25, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Marlon Brando
Picture of TRUTHTELLER59
posted Hide Post
If its a web movie you can list it as a film.
 
Posts: 2134 | Location: LA,CA | Registered: May 06, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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