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Johnny Depp
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quote:
Originally posted by TheActress/Model:
quote:
Originally posted by MichaelKruse:
I don't think it's a matter of them not being able to get me in for co-star roles, I just don't think they want to waste time with them since they'd barely make any money if I got booked. That's why I was thinking that a middle-tier management company, one that has the time and interest to deal with co-star roles, might benefit me.

And yes, you're right! The CW, MTV, and ABC Family are the networks where I've been receiving the most attention. That's where we're aiming for now.


*sigh* You've completely missed my point. I know all of the above because I said as much in my last post.

I'm just questioning why you think that's all okay?

They won't do the work which be SO EASY for them. Someone from CESD getting an actor seen for a co-star would be a piece of cake. Instead, they want YOU to find someone else to do the work for THEM. And then they'll STILL take 10% if you book a co-star, on top of the new percentage you'd have to pay to this new "mid-level" team member.

That doesn't seem completely f*cked up to you?


Ohhh, I get what you're saying now. Yea, if that's the situation that's occurring, it's unfortunate for me.

So even if my manager gets me in for a role that I ultimately book, where my agent had nothing to do with it, I still have to pay 10% to my agent? I understand managers can't legally negotiate contracts.

So if you were in my current situation, what would you do?
 
Posts: 35 | Location: Los Angeles | Registered: April 23, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Sean Penn
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I would not be seeking a manager. Instead I would let my agent know that I would like to be sent out for co stars for now until I book a few in order to eventually make it easier for me to secure guest star roles down the road. Just as model/actress stated.

This article kind of explains the logic that I would be basing my decisions off of. In this situation you're "Holly".

http://www.backstage.com/advic...rom-start-to-finish/
 
Posts: 11 | Location: Los Angeles | Registered: June 05, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Johnny Depp
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by MichaelKruse:

Ohhh, I get what you're saying now. Yea, if that's the situation that's occurring, it's unfortunate for me.

So even if my manager gets me in for a role that I ultimately book, where my agent had nothing to do with it, I still have to pay 10% to my agent? I understand managers can't legally negotiate contracts.

So if you were in my current situation, what would you do?


Everything that I'm saying is based on the assumption that you're signed with your theatrical agent. If that's the case, then I'm 99.9% positive that your contract does not differentiate between work procured by your agent, and work procured by another party, whether a manager or yourself. This means that ANY paid theatrical work that you book, entitles your agent to 10% in commission whether they had a hand in helping you get it or not.

READ YOUR FREAKIN' CONTRACTS PEOPLE!!!

*takes a deep breath*

To answer your question, I would have a serious sit down with my agent about how I could realistically develop into a working actor. I saw that audition tape you had posted on your AA profile and it was really bad. I'm shocked that your agent didn't make you take it down. You claim that you've gotten better but until you took that tape down a couple of days ago (at the urging of complete strangers, not your agent that should be more invested in you), THAT was all casting directors could see of your talent.

You need chances to prove yourself to casting directors and the only way to do that is to consistently do great work in the room. Generally that starts with smaller roles before they trust you with guest star material. Yes, you could possibly book one of those teen dramas on MTV or the CW, but even the actors on those shows have credits before booking those parts.

For example, on that new MTV show "Faking It", ALL of the main actors, while considered unknowns, had very strong credits before being cast. The only one that didn't was a recent contestant on American Idol.

Unless you're 10 years old, you're not booking a series regular role with absolutely no credits unless you have prior public visibility such as The X-Factor or American Idol.

Yes, there are always one or two exceptions, but exceptions don't disprove the rule.

So like I've said before, I would talk to my agent about rethinking their stance on submitting for co-stars or at the very least, get more clarity on why they feel that way. The spaghetti method may be okay for them since they have so many clients, but you are your own person and need to take more control of your career path by making sure they're doing their job. You can't do your job if they don't do theirs.

***Spaghetti Method: Throwing a bunch of cooked spaghetti at the wall and seeing what sticks. Commonly used by agents who aren't interested in helping develop their clients.***
 
Posts: 75 | Location: Los Angeles | Registered: January 19, 2014Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Sean Penn
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Hey guys, I started emailing managers. How many of people on here have one and do they help you at all? Sorry again never had a manager and trying to make the best decisions I can Smiler
 
Posts: 170 | Location: LA | Registered: December 11, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Sean Penn
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Also just signed up for UCB starting in may. Hopefully I learn a lot from this!
 
Posts: 170 | Location: LA | Registered: December 11, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Al Pacino
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quote:
Originally posted by winteriscoming:
Also just signed up for UCB starting in may. Hopefully I learn a lot from this!


You will love it. It is great. And I highly recommend reading a good chunk of the book before class starts. And then seeing as many shows as humanly possible.
 
Posts: 763 | Location: New York | Registered: January 25, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Sean Penn
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The main thing I want to get out of it is having less nerves while performing and getting out of my head, so hopefully it helps. Yeah i plan on ready as much of the book as I can. Thank you!
 
Posts: 170 | Location: LA | Registered: December 11, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Johnny Depp
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by LA.BA-Theatre Student:
I would not be seeking a manager. Instead I would let my agent know that I would like to be sent out for co stars for now until I book a few in order to eventually make it easier for me to secure guest star roles down the road. Just as model/actress stated.

This article kind of explains the logic that I would be basing my decisions off of. In this situation you're "Holly".

http://www.backstage.com/advic...rom-start-to-finish/


Perfect article for my situation! Thanks for sharing that. I think that's the best game plan for now too - reiterate my desire to go out for co-stars.
 
Posts: 35 | Location: Los Angeles | Registered: April 23, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Sean Penn
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Mike, has CESD sent you in for co-star roles at all? I'm curious why you think they don't want to waste their time with them.

I know two developing actors in their youth department at CESD and they get sent out on co-star roles. But then again, the youth department might be different than the adult department so it might be a different situation.
 
Posts: 86 | Location: Los Angeles | Registered: June 28, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Johnny Depp
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quote:
Originally posted by Ninja:
Mike, has CESD sent you in for co-star roles at all? I'm curious why you think they don't want to waste their time with them.

I know two developing actors in their youth department at CESD and they get sent out on co-star roles. But then again, the youth department might be different than the adult department so it might be a different situation.


I feel like I know you, Ninja!

I was last sent out for a co-star in November and was also sent out for a contract role a few weeks ago. Not much going on at all right now for me. Prior to this year, I would have 8 series regular or lead roles to 1 co-star.

While it seems that all of the theatrical agents will essentially pass around actors for various projects to submit on, I haven't been out much for the younger characters - although I can definitely play under 18.

Also, I'm pretty confident that CESD's youth division is quite a bit stronger than the adult. I think I remember SAM and Truth mentioning this before.
 
Posts: 35 | Location: Los Angeles | Registered: April 23, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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